News

Patrick WilsonEvolving Geometries: Line, Form, and Color

Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech, 25 September - 20 November

Building on the rich tradition of geometric abstraction, three one-person exhibitions take the visual language of line, form, and color in compelling directions. In the first part of the 20th century, artists such as Wassily Kandinksky (1866-1944), Kasimir Malevich (1878-1935), and Piet Mondrian (1872-1944) explored a vocabulary of simple geometric forms—rectangles, triangles, squares, and line—in abstract compositions that addressed universal truths and utopian ideas. This tradition, carried forth, expanded, and transformed over the course of the 20th century, continues into the present with innovative approaches to the genre by:

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Markus LinnenbrinkEXPO Projects

13 September 2014

EXPO Projects
IN/SITU provides exhibiting galleries the opportunity to showcase large-scale installations and site-specific works by leading artists during EXPO CHICAGO. Curated by Renaud Proch, Executive Director of Independent Curators International (ICI), the 2014 edition of the program is a reflection on artistic practice in Chicago, and on the intense exchange of ideas that the city generates.

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Franklin EvansArtist Talk

Montserrat College of Art, 12 September 2014

Franklin Evans’ site-specific, all-encompassing environments include unstretched canvases, wall paintings, photos, sound and theoretical texts. Celebrating connections over divisions, Evans’s work brings images and ideas together through indexing, cataloguing and mapping. 

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Franklin Evansjuddrules

Monserrat Gallery, 17 September – 14 December 2014

Montserrat College of Art is proud to present juddrules featuring New York-based artist Franklin Evans. While Evans considers himself first and foremost a painter his works are process-based physical environments, surrounded by the very source materials that conceptually inform his paintings. “It’s like walking into a painting,” describes Evans, anticipating how Montserrat Gallery will evolve into a ‘landscape’ of ephemeral and factual materials over the course of his three week residency.

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Monique van GenderenBright star: Monique van Genderen's abstract paintings by Michael Abatemarco

Santa Fe New Mexican, 8 August 2014

The paintings of Monique van Genderen are something to move into: spaces defined by shape, color, depth, and motion. Van Genderen, a self-described nonobjective abstractionist, is hard to pin down to a particular genre or art movement, although her work touches on quite a few — including Abstract Expressionism, color-field painting, and Abstract Illusionism — while remaining in a class by itself. “I am working with a lot of elements of illusion, specifically conceptual illusions, playing with people’s expectations of what they’re looking at,” she told Pasatiempo. “Sometimes I landed in the color-field genre because I was making more reduced paintings with shapes I collaged together. But I’m really attempting to make every painting pretty different.” With notable, well-received exhibits on both coasts under her belt, van Genderen, a Los Angeles-based artist, comes to Santa Fe for her inaugural show at TAI Modern.

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Franklin EvansNew Acquisitions

Roanoke College, 5 September - 5 October 2014

This exhibition of new acquisitions brings together recent gifts to the Roanoke College's Permanent Art Collection that augments the strengths of the College's diverse holdings. Works represent internationally and nationally known artists: Derrick Adam, Ricky Allman, Michelle Arcilia, Dennis Ashbaugh, Pattie Lee Becker, Alex Brown, N. Dash, Franklin Evans, Clare Gill, Tatsuro Kiuchi, Mike Montero, Carrie Marill, Gary Peterson, Valerie Roybal, Mark Uriksen, and Firooz Zahedi.

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Franklin EvansModel as Mayhem by Matthew Farina

Artcritical, 5 August 2014

Entering Ameringer McEnery & Yohe, those who have followed Franklin Evans’s work over the last 10 years will recognize the artist’s application of readily accessible, process-spun materials to the gallery walls and floor. Materials that might otherwise be pulled from a painter’s trashcan, including paint-scuffed masking tape, clippings from photo albums and incomplete works on paper, are positioned in bursts of action that may at first seem disorganized. The solo exhibition, “paintingassupermodel,” is Evans’s first at Ameringer and succeeds as a personal rumination on Yve Alain Bois’s 1990 bookPainting as Model. Celebrated abstract paintings by Matisse, Mondrian and Newman, which Bois discusses in his book, make appearances in the exhibition.

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Hans HofmannHans Hofmann: Artist's works to be shown at Cal museum by Julian Guthrie

SF Gate, 31 July 2014

German American Abstract ExpressionistHans Hofmann credited his time teaching painting at UC Berkeley in the early 1930s for his "start in America as a teacher and artist."

Hofmann thanked the university with a gift of nearly 50 paintings representing the breadth of his life work, from Surrealist-influenced compositions to more physical and abstract images. The paintings are on display at the UC Berkeley Art Museum through Dec. 21 and represent the largest collection of the noted painter's work in any museum.

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Patrick WilsonNOW-ism: Abstraction Today

Pizzuti Collection, 6 September 2014 – 20 June 2015

A thought-provoking exhibition of twenty-first century painting, sculpture, video and furnishings representing the newest abstract work from today’s best artists. NOW-ISM features international emerging stars like Sarah Cain, Diana Al-Hadid and Florian Meisenberg and established artists including Columbus’ own art star Ann Hamilton, Jim Hodges, Teresita Fernández, Jason Middlebrook, Carrie Moyer and Pia Fries. The show will include more than 100 works spanning all three floors of the space.

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Thomas BurkeNOW-ism: Abstraction Today

Pizzuti Collection, 6 September 2014 – 20 June 2015

A thought-provoking exhibition of twenty-first century painting, sculpture, video and furnishings representing the newest abstract work from today’s best artists. NOW-ISM features international emerging stars like Sarah Cain, Diana Al-Hadid and Florian Meisenberg and established artists including Columbus’ own art star Ann Hamilton, Jim Hodges, Teresita Fernández, Jason Middlebrook, Carrie Moyer and Pia Fries. The show will include more than 100 works spanning all three floors of the space.

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Franklin Evans5 Must-See Gallery Shows by Scott Indrisek

Blouin Artinfo, 18 July 14

Franklin Evans, “paintingassupermodel,” at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe through August 1

Understated and subtle are two adjectives that will never be applied to Evans’s work. For his debut at this gallery, he cannibalizes the entire space — including the floors — creating a massively dense, referential installation that’s terrifically entertaining to get lost within. Paint-spattered tape, computer print-outs, enlarged-and-stretched digital photos, and architectural schematics cover the walls; Plexi vitrines hold photographs and tiny sculptural odds-and-ends.

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Iva GueorguievaVariations: Conversations in and Around Abstract Painting

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 24 August 2014 – 22 March 2015

In an attention-compromised age when images are instant and prevalent, abstract painting serves as a contradiction, acting as a conduit for the mark of the original, individual artist. While most of the work in the exhibition has been recently created and acquired, additional paintings culled from LACMA’s collection illustrate how artists have reanimated techniques and forms using other sources that are appropriated from popular culture, photography, and collage, essentially creating a new variation of abstract painting.

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Markus LinnenbrinkThe Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

11 July 2014

A time-lapse video of Markus Linnenbrink painting the installation THERIDENEVERENDS. The painting was completed over the course of seven days in June, 2014.

 

 

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Franklin EvansBlake Gopnik's Latest Sightings

Blouin Artinfo, 14 July 2014

Daily Pic: Franklin Evans Shows Us Painting Today

This is a view into a manic installation called “paintingassupermodel,” by Franklin Evans. It’s now filling the Ameringer McEnery Yohe gallery in New York. The title is a clever updating of “Painting as Model,” the name of a famous 1993 book by art historian Yve-Alain Bois, sped up to the pace of the 21st century. There’s not even time for a break between words.

Evan’s installation does a pretty good job conjuring the feel of art as it is now experienced, as a ceaseless barrage of image and information and commerce that we’re supposed to take as-is, without too much processing or doubt. “Paintingassupermodel” levels the playing field between Matisse and Photoshop. What I couldn’t decide, as I took in the piece, was whether its frantic complexities acted as an invitation to dig deep to figure them out, or to skim along across their surfaces.

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Stephen DeanLight3 by Kelly Robbins

Fridman Gallery, 12 June - 11 July 2014

Light3 at the Fridman Gallery in New York, curated by Lilly Wei, is a must-see for anyone interested in the multiple ways in which light challenges our perception of colour, form and structure. The exhibition features the work of Stephen Dean, Jan Tichy and Ethan Ryman, three artists with very different sensibilities, who employ light as a means of defamiliarising what we see. Studio International had the opportunity to speak with Dean and Tichy about their work at the gallery. Ryman answered our questions via email.

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Franklin EvansPainting as Model by Patrick Neal

Hyperallergic, 9 July 2014

Yve-Alain Bois’s book Painting as Model was written twenty-odd years ago and continues to be an important text, providing conceptual fodder for many contemporary art practices. A case in point is the current exhibition of painting and installation by the artist Franklin Evans where a physical copy of Painting as Modelsits up front and center on the gallery floor while material unleashed from the book orbits about the space.

 

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Markus LinnenbrinkOFF THE WALL!

The Kunsthalle Nürnberg, 17 July 2014 - 10 December 2014

With installations of Cornelia Baltes, Benjamin Houlihan, Markus Linnenbrink, Claudia & Julia Müller, Christine Streuli and Alexander Wolff

Traditionally, based on two-dimensional painting, and can only reflect the image of a three-dimensional space. The group exhibition  Off the Wall! Image spaces and space forming but r presents positions of contemporary painting that make these classic two-dimensional self-conscious questioning. The invited artists expand the painting, by not restricting their works on the flat image carrier, but include the external architectural surroundings with. Her painting is the volume way up, expands and reaches into the third dimension. It occupies the exhibition space, for example through sculptural and installation-process or by the exhibition space - including the walls and floors - is at an all-over painting. "! Off the Wall" The exhibition title is always ambiguous to understand: In its literal translation it means as much as, but at the same time is in the English language for "unorthodox" or "" Off the Wall "" Off the Wall! " unconventional ".

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Markus LinnenbrinkThe Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

23 June 2014

If you walk by Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts' Hamilton Building this week, you’ll be greeted by a colorful new surprise. 

The legendary fine arts institution has commissioned German-born, New York-based contemporary artist Markus Linnenbrink to create a 118-foot vibrant masterpiece in the entrance hall. He is well known for his abstract, layered, colorful works.

 

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Franklin EvansSuper Sized Pastiche Royale by Oscar Laluyan

ARTE FUSE, 6 June 2014

The studio is where it's at - that's ground zero where the artist's thought process and experimentation explode into fruition.  Now what if you take that investigation into the gallery interior and set it free all over?  AF walked into the solo exhibition of Franklin Evans for paintingsassupermodel last week to witness the full color explosion come to life.  Maybe there was no Gisele Bundchen or Chanel Iman aka Super Models present but art was definitely making itself known in Super Sized doses. 

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George McNeilArt & Antiques

June 2014, By Carter Ratcliff

The contemporary New York art world has a backstory, rarely consulted, that begins in the optimistic 1920s and moves on to the bleak 1930s, a decade of Depression and institutional indifference to such local figures as Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. Then came the 1940s, with its succession of astonishing breakthroughs, followed by the ’50s, which trained the spotlights of critical recognition and market success on so many of the pioneers, who by that time had been gathered under the Abstract Expressionist label. As the ’60s began, even some of the second-generation practitioners of AbEx—Alfred Leslie, Joan Mitchell—were acquiring high profiles. But not George McNeil, even though he belonged to the first generation.

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Franklin Evans: paintingassupermodelby James Kalm

Painters' Table

James Kalm visits the exhibition Franklin Evans: paintingassupermodel at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, New York, on view through 1 August 2014. 

Kalm notes: "Franklin Evans has been receiving much critical attention for his blurring of painting, the studio and installation.  Using the rubbish of his studio practice, particularly used masking tape and paint stained cloths, the artist fills the gallery top to bottom with colorful remnants, wall paintings and enlarged photos from previous installations, thereby presenting these projects as accumulations not only of materials, but also of memories.

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Stephen DeanFútbol: The Beautiful Game, LACMA

2 February - 20 July 2014

The exhibition examines football - nicknamed "the beautiful game" by one sports commentator - and its significance in societies around the world.  As a subject, football touches on issues of nationalism and identity, globalism and mass spectacle, as well as the common human experience shared by spectators from many cultures.  Celebrating the sport on the eve of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, the exhibition includes approximately thirty artists from around the world who work in video, photography, painting and sculpture.  Two room-sized video, photography, painting and sculpture.  Two room-sized video installations - Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait, by the artists Philippe Parreno and Douglas Gordon, and Volta by Stephen Dean - anchor the exhibition.  Other works by artists including Miguel Calderon (whose 2004 video Mexico v. Brasil represents a 17-0 victory for Mexico). Robin Rhode, Kehinde Wiley, and Andy Warhol provide a sense of the miraculous possibilities of the sport as universal conversation piece. 

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Stephen DeanLIGHT3

Fridman Gallery, 12 June - 12 July 2014

While light has long been associated with the spiritual and metaphysical, Stephen Dean, Ethan Ryman and Jan Tichy emphasize its more phenomenal and psychological qualities. In their work, it is treated analytically—although not without a sense of the poetic—as a means to comprehend and engage with the world.

 

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Markus LinnenbrinkMorrison & Foerster’s New York Office Anchors Innovative Manhattan High-rise

Morrison & Foerster New York, 3 June 2014

As part of the launch of its new office, Morrison & Foerster commissioned prominent New York artist Markus Linnenbrink to produce eight original 9-X-42-foot paintings for the space. Each of the oversized works will adorn one of the firm’s eight elevator lobby areas. The paintings reflect Linnenbrink’s trademark style of using the medium of acrylic and a myriad of pigments to form a full spectrum of colors on wood panels.

www.mofo.com

 

 

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Julio Larraz: 200 Years of PowerGaleria Arteconsult, Panama

11 June 2014

The title 200 Years in Power represents both the name of the show and the painting on the cover.  Julio has always wanted the viewer to establish a narrative based on their own imagination.  The characters in the painting should also be left for the viewer to contemplate and determine for themselves, but the simple meaning of the title and the work is the "usurpation of power, or the abuse of power".  Julio's characters are hand picked and may not relate directly to the subject matter at all.  Other times, there is a crystal clear connection that forces ones imagination in a certain direction.

Julio's inspiration is often unique and distant.  In The Mind's Eye he discusses how images come to him as if in a dream and his constant attempt to capture them before they disappear.  His works are generally combinations of visual images that come to him mixed with philosophical questions that he is contemplating internally.  Julio prefers to not discuss too much of the visions and complexity within his imagination, as he prefers to allow the work to be a question, provoking thought and investigation within ones own imagination.


Markus Linnenbrink: The Skull ShowThe Bedford Gallery at Lesher Center for the Arts

12 June - 31 August 2014

Closing their season, the Bedford Gallery will narrow its focus to the physical and historical world of the skull. The Skull Show examines the role that skulls have played in the historical register, as memento mori, traditional religious icons, and vanitas themes in still life paintings. The Skull Show will also highlight the role the skull has played in the contemporary arts, exploring its appearance in counter cultures such as skate, surf, tattoo, as well as urban graffiti projects. 

 

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Markus Linnenbrink

Odetta Gallery, 30 May - 29 June 2014

Markus Linnenbrink will be exhibiting in his neighborhood of Bushwick for the first time, showing his large-­‐scale painting MEINWILDEHERZ and other recent work. MEINWILDEHERZ embodies layers of emotion, memory and a passion for the gestural abstraction of the mid-­‐20th century Abstract Expressionists.

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Iva GueorguievaGueorguieva's collaged paintings at Samson by Cate McQuaid

Boston Globe, 13 May 2014

There’s nothing soothing about Iva Gueorguieva’s dense, elastic, collaged paintings at Samson. Many of them have the look of a city imploding. Lines tangle, planes twist and bend; forms shatter. With colors, collisions, and veering angles, she sends a viewer’s eye ricocheting.

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Julio Larraz in "Caribbean: Crossroads of the World"

Pérez Art Museum Miami, 18 April - 17 August 2014

Caribbean: Crossroads of the World will highlight over two centuries of rarely seen works—from paintings and sculptures to prints, photographs, installations, films, and videos—dating from the Haitian Revolution to the present. This exhibition employs an inter-disciplinary approach to advance our understanding of the Caribbean and its artistic heritage and contemporary practices. It focuses on four central themes: Fluid Motions, Counterpoints, Shades of History, and Kingdoms of this World. These interconnected frameworks allow insight into the complex context from which the vital and varied artistic production of the region has emerged, illuminating the multiple histories of the region.

Julio Larraz's featured work from 2013 is titled Traffic.

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Triangle Cloud by Brian AlfredArt | Basel | Hong Kong: Film Program

15 - 18 May 2014

Curated by Li Zhenhua, director and founder of Beijing Art Lab, the Film sector presents an exciting program of films by and about artists. 

Screenings take place in the agnès b. cinema at the Hong Kong Arts Centre.

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Six Decades in Wolf Kahn's Landscapeby John Seed

Hyperallergic, 30 April 2014

The earliest painting on view in Wolf Kahn: Six Decades is a large landscape-derived abstraction from 1960 titled “Into a Clearing.” It features a loose, pulsing welter of brushstrokes that coalesce into lush zones of breathing, blooming color. “Weaving Gray and Yellow,” another oil on canvas completed fifty-four years later, and also on display in “Six Decades” shows a similar gestural approach but with added notes of linearity and a little less painterly vapor.  Consistently in love with landscape — and the idea of landscape as an abstraction — Wolf Kahn has lovingly built a very vivid and beautiful oeuvre since first exhibiting his paintings at the Hansa Gallery, one of New York’s first co-op galleries, nearly sixty years ago.

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Wolf KahnWolf Kahn and Six Decades of Color by Scott Indrisek

Blouin Artinfo, 28 April 2014

At 86, Wolf Kahn is still a firecracker. The painter — who has spent the majority of his life in New York, and who is known for vibrantly colored landscapes and nature scenes — is the subject of a six-decade retrospective on view at Ameringer McEnery Yohe through May 31. “The earlier the painting is, the better it seems to me to be,” Kahn deadpanned, thinking back to some of the canvases he produced in the early ’60s. “I think I’ve gone downhill ever since.” On a more serious note, he’s proud of himself for not resting on his laurels: “Here I am, still trying to do things that I don’t know how to do, strike out in new directions. I think that’s very healthy, and I consider myself fortunate.”

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Brian AlfredNew Animations

Hezi Cohen Gallery, 24 April - 31 May 2014

The work of New York-based artist Brian Alfred examines the relations between the media and the real, underscoring the gap between reportage and first-person experience.  Alfred's sources of reference range from news items, which aspire to etch their images in the consciousness of all, to sights taken by Alfred himself while traveling.  Two primary means to his work - fragmentation and abstraction - take us back in their directness to the experimental works of early modernism.  Alfred uses the fragment to claim the viewer's alertness, but as opposed to the avant-garde artists, the world from which he reports appears to be already saturated with and inured to sensations. 

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Iva GueorguievaSamson

18 April - 31 May 2014

Don't be fooled: they're not pretty.  They might be harmonic, but dissonance dominates.  And while they're birthed in a series of personal reveries, every time in the outcome they're social.  I recall Adorno thought Schoenberg was valid because his meticulously-fractured, mathematically-battered structures perfectly mapped the world from which they withdrew.  And later it was: yes to poetry after Auschwitz...provided it's a scream.  You might think this too heavy given the living color and the hypnotic-magnetic allure of Iva's toppling geometries.  But that's why I start with a warning.  Don't look away; trust the nauseous corner of your eye.  Three out of four paintings are mean and the fourth one is an apocalypse.  

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Sandra Mendelsohn RubinInterview by John Seed

Huffington Post, 16 April 2014

For nearly 35 years, while the art world has hemmed and hawed, painter Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin has steered a steady course. As Rubin's subject matter has progressed -- most recently Rubin has been painting aerial views -- her technique has remained consistently spellbinding. Rubin builds up the surfaces of her work with undiluted, unglazed layers of oil paint applied with uncanny precision. The resulting paintings, which are often small in scale, demonstrate the artist's deeply felt exploration of her surroundings and also her sense of their underlying energies.

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Patrick LeeNew Drawings

Western Project, 29 March - 3 May 2014

Western Project is proud to present the third solo exhibition by Los Angeles artist, Patrick Lee. For over ten years Lee has worked on his series Deadly Friends; an investigation into the lives of men on the streets of America. Looking to understand the subtle and often forceful appearances of men the artist has created a body of work this time inspired by the environs around LA City Jail and the nearby Union Station.

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Franklin EvansA word with the artist: Franklin Evans

RENO Magazine, 20 March 2014

Timepaths, a process-based multi-media installation by Reno-born artist Franklin Evans, served as the inspiration and the backdrop for RENO Magazine’s spring fashion spread. The installation, housed at the Nevada Museum of Art through April 20, investigates the complex paths Evans has taken as a contemporary artist.

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Kevin AppelKevin Appel Answers the Perennial Question: New York or Los Angeles?

Artsy.net, 17 March 2014

Many words have been spilled recently, by artists in particular, over the perennial question: New York or Los Angeles? On the occasion of Kevin Appel’s first solo exhibition in NYC since 2009, and his first ever with Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe it seems we may have found one of the more levelheaded voices yet to enter the conversation. “Los Angeles has always had a bit of an identity crisis, partially due to the external view of L.A. as having this superficial mentality tied to the film industry,” explains the photographer-cum-painter, an Angeleno for all his life save for a brief stint studying in Manhattan. “It doesn’t have a long lineage of a canonical or intellectual history, as opposed to New York.”

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Franklin EvansFranklin Evans by Maria Calandra

Pencil in the Studio, 9 March 2014

Nearly 50 visits in and I finally made it across the river to draw, spending the day with Franklin Evans in his studio in the Lower East Side a couple of Saturdays ago. After making my way down Bowery, I looked up to see short neon strips of tape and painted pieces of paper that were missing their center squares, dangling from the inside of windows of a second floor apartment building. I knew I was in the right place. I had the overwhelming feeling of having been in this studio before when I walked in to his space. I soon realized I was thinking back to the strong impression his elaborate mixed-media exhibition at Sue Scott Gallery had on me in the spring of 2012. It was a memorable glimpse into the artist's mind, studio, and process. Evans was breaking the fourth wall with that exhibition and remembering it made me even more eager to begin my drawing.

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Franklin EvansMaterial Images curated by Nate Hitchcock

at Johannes Vogt Gallery 6 March-5 April 2014

“Material Images” brings together 10 artists whose practices encompass a diverse range of formal and procedural strategies. Tying them together are their concerns with abstraction and issues of materialization surrounding the status of images today.

Kari Altmann, Trudy Benson, Petra Cortright, Franklin Evans, Lauren Luloff, Michael Manning, Jessica Sanders, Kate Steciw, Rebecca Ward and Jeff Zilm

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Iva GueorguievaIva Gueorguieva’s Surface-Effect By Nadiah Fellah

New American Paintings, 18 February 2014

Iva Gueorguieva’s (NAP #73) paintings, on view at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe in New York, bring a breathe of California sun to our frigid New York winter. Working up the surfaces of her large canvases into almost a fetishized frenzy, the paintings are abstract, yet indicative of movement. By denying viewers the ability to rest their eyes on any one component for too long, her works are both mesmerizing and disconcerting, inducing frustration as one tries to pinpoint figures or structures within the compositions. Fractions, edges, and suggestions of such imagery exist, but are ungraspable as they dissolve into the chaos of each scene.

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Iva GueorguievaIva Gueorguieva's Projector Compressor by Sarah Bay Williams

ArtSlant, 9 February 2014

You think I’m describing your lover to you, exactly the night you met, twenty years ago. “But what about...” you begin, and think better of it, allowing me my impressions, limited and one-dimensional compared to yours—you, who sought and found all the ecstatic tickling flutters and sudden despairs of the heart, explored every hill and dale of their form, caught every nuance of manner and nervous tick.

But I’m not writing about your lover. This is about the paintings and sculpture of Iva Gueorguieva, the emotionally rife and viscerally electrifying works with which you, I, or anyone else, may become intimately acquainted in very personal and differing ways. You may see the small patch of blue that makes you want to cry; I, the red flutter of lines that burns magnetic like solar flares; someone else, the dark, dark lagoon harboring a gravitational pull like the center of the galaxy. Her marks and shapes feels more like moments in time – a millisecond in the midst of furious activity – than like areas of space filled with paint. If you really get to know Women and the Ocean (2013) or Suitor (2013), as you would a partner, you’ll find that these paintings have lives of their own.

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Iva GueorguievaInterview by Arthur Peña

ART HAPS, 8 February 2014

Arthur Peña: The role of history plays a big part in your work. This operates in two modes of objective history such as art historical content and the broader negotiation with our past and also the subjective history of your decisions that rest within the painting. How do you mediate between these two sets of history as content?

Iva Gueorguieva: I believe that we all carry within our flesh the memories, desires and traumas of the previous generations. There is a muscle memory that becomes alive in the act of painting and I feel it.

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Rod Penner and Suzanne CaporaelReview by Lilly Wei

ARTnews, February 2014

Rod Penner's small, meticulously painted landscapes of Texas and its environs, all from the last three years, pack a hefty amount of big sky and small town into their abbreviated formats. Penner pictures cafes (including a beautiful one showing a neon "Mexican Food" sign's reflection shimmering green on the rain-slicked surface of the parking lot), as well as convenience stores, laundromats, garages, houses along highways, nondescript main streets, and strip malls. Numerous gas stations are shown that might or might not be abandoned.

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Julio Larraz“Two Hundred Years in Power” Galeria Arteconsult, Panama city, Panama, in collaboration with Ascaso Gallery

November 2013 - February 2014

Julio Larraz was born in Havana, Cuba, 12 March 1944. The son of a newspaper editor, he began drawing at a very early age. In 1961 his whole family moved to Miami, Florida. In 1962 they moved to Washington, DC, and in 1964 to New York. There he began to draw political caricatures that were published by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune and Vogue magazine, among others.

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Patrick WilsonReview by David Pagel

Los Angeles Times, 23 January 2014

If Patrick Wilson tossed a pebble into a pond, the ripples that emanated from it would probably take the shape of perfectly formed squares or nicely proportioned rectangles. That is the image his exhibition, “Steak Night,” leaves the viewer: an impossible change to the laws of nature that brings you face to face with a world more beautiful that the real one. 

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Liat YossiforA Conversation with Liat Yossifor by Lilliana Rodrigues

The Nomadic Journal, 9 January 2014

Lilliana Rodrigues – I understand that your new work is done in three-days per painting. I am curious about this time constraint you impose on yourself. In the past, fresco painters had to deal with the properties of freshly laid wet plaster and pigments; thus, they were forced to paint quickly. What does it mean for you, as a contemporary painter, to set a time constraint on yourself?

Liat Yossifor – I have worked before with one layer of paint while it is still wet and moveable, and the duration of the piece was until the paint starts to dry, which for oil paint is on the fourth day. But in the past two years, I have switched over to large scale, which is when these short sessions began to matter. Now, regardless of the drying properties, I set the clock as a way to structure the process. I work fast, and in continuum – one three-day session to the next – and I feel like I am in a constant state of flux, in liquid, until the layer starts to oxidize and then I step out and go for the next run with the next painting.

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Hans HofmannHans Hofmann's Purple Modernism by Daniel Larkin

Hyperallergic, 21 January 2014

In the realm of high-modern abstract painting, the color purple rarely gets the spotlight. The hue doesn't have its own Picasso phase, like rose or blue. And let's face it: Jackson Pollock's "Lavender Mist" is light on the lavender and heavy on the black and white. So it's exciting to watch Hans Hofmann play with purple and give it center stage in a pair of works on view right now at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe.

 

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Patrick WilsonSteak Night

at Susanne Vielmetter, 11 January - 22 February 2014

Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects is pleased to announce the gallery's sixth solo exhibition for new work by Patrick Wilson. Wilson is known for creating finely calibrated, luminous abstract paintings composed of lines and quadrilaterals. He uses a simple and straightforward medium, paint on canvas, to build a richly layered composition of complex spatial dynamics. 

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Michael ReafsnyderSunday Best

at Susanne Vielmetter, 11 January - 22 February 2014

Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects is pleased to announce the gallery's first solo exhibition with Los Angeles-based painter, Michael Reafsnyder.

Inspired by the CoBrA movement and abstract expressionism, Reafsnyder's paintings are thick with paint, exuberant gestures, and vibrant color. He uses indulgent amounts of acrylic to build compositions that prioritize the surface of the canvas; proposing an experience of painting that is as tactile as it is visual. Concerned with pleasure, joy, and frivolity, his work galvinizes sensory experiences and challenges historical cliches of the artist's psychic self-expression and metaphysical drama. 

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Gene DavisReview by Donald Kuspit

Artforum, December 2013

Made between 1961 and 1985, the eight enormous acrylic-on-canvas paintings by Gene Davis in this show - all composed of vertical bands and stripes - testify to the artist's devotion to color. "To understand what my painting is all about," Davis once said, "look at my painting in terms of individual colors...select[ing] a specific color such as yellow or a lime green, and take the time to see how it operates across the painting." When one looks at Yellow Jacket, 1969, one notices yellow used in a variety of ways: On the right, narrow vertical lines of yellow are tightly interspersed with orange lines; on the left, blue and pink stripes are sandwiched between relatively wide bands of lemon; and in roughly the center, medium-size gold stripes emerge from within a broad swath of lime green. The result is a dazzling irregularity - the yellow takes on a variety of qualities, multiple personalities. Larger, toneless vertical lines on either side contain the painting more or less in half. The work's eccentric yet reasoned structure, coupled with the colors' various tones and intensities, makes for an ingeniously polyphonic musical painting.

 

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Brian AlfredArt | Basel | Miami Beach: Film Program

4 December 2013

Art Basel presents a premier program of films by and about artists, selected by David Gryn, Director of London's Artprojx, and Zurich collector This Brunner. Gryn's 2013 program presents over 70 film and video works drawn from the show's participating galleries. 

The third edition of David Gryn's selection for Art Basel's Miami Beach show explores the collaborative creative process via intersections between visual artists, composers, musicians, choreographers, dancers, and animators.

artupdate.com

www.youtube.com


Suzanne Caporaelby Will Heinrich

galleristny.com, 19 November 2013

There are worse things you could do with The New York Times than cut blocks of color out of its photos and advertisements and glue them together, as Suzanne Caporael does, into elegant, postcard-size, abstract collages. In 028 (like calculus), five superimposed sections make a neat white frame around a vertical bicolor of violet-black and pale blue. A golden yellow curver sinks down from the top toward a white square with a muddy purple corner folded in. A slightly muddled edge above the darker half, three round bumps at the bottom, faint white lines where the framing newsprint covers another piece's edge, some type on the verso just barely showing through, and the partial date - the piece was made this year, sometime after the 10th of a month ending in "y" - all pull together, as curated accidents and gracefully understated decisions.

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Brian Alfred100 Works for 100 Years: A Centennial Celebration

Montclair Art Museum, 15 January 2014 - 31 July 2014

On January 15, 2014, the Montclair Art Museum will celebrate its centennial. On view will be a collection-based exhibition throughout the Museum and its grounds, with 100 works reflecting its rich cultural history and legacy. 

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Franklin EvansConversation with Greg Lindquist

The Brooklyn Rail, 5 November 2013

In a series of conversations held over the past summer months and into a fall museum installation, artist Franklin Evans spoke with artist and Art Books in Review editor Greg Lindquist. The two discussed the relationships of Evans’s process-based painting installations to Internet media, digital technologies, and the related phenomena of discontinuous focus. Evans’s solo exhibition timepaths opened at the Nevada Museum of Art on October 5, 2013 and will remain on view until April 20, 2014.

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Rod PennerInterview by John Seed

Huffington Post, 25 October 2013

Rod Penner, a Texas-based photorealist, is currently showing a selection of his painstakingly crafted paintings of small town Texas at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe in New York. The exhibition – which New York Magazine hailed as “superb” – includes a suite of six inch square paintings that feature bravura depictions of tire stores, muddy roads and rutted asphalt.

 

 

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Brian AlfredRepresented by Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

New York, New York - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce that Brian Alfred is now represented by the gallery.

 

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Franklin Evanstimepaths

The Nevada Museum of Art, 5 October 2013 - 20 April 2014

timepaths is a process-based, multi-media installation by Reno-born artist Franklin Evans that investigates the complex paths he’s taken as a contemporary artist. Now living in New York and showing in galleries internationally, Evans first started painting at Stanford University as an undergraduate in 1987. At that time university art programs tended to maintain distinct boundaries between various media. Evans, however, sought a more complex visual language and began to explore the dissolution of distinct media through collaborations with choreographers, writers, and curators. His resulting installations take on the appearance of labyrinthine studio spaces where materials from diverse times and places in his life provide context and are given equal attention.

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Gene Davis

Wall Street Journal, 14 September 2013

"Look at the painting in terms of individual colors," said the Washington painter of vertical stripes, Gene Davis (1920-1985). "In other words, instead of simply glancing at the work, select a specific color such as yellow or a lime green, and take the time to see how it operates across the painting.... And then, you can understand what my painting is all about." Usually—at least with me—it's annoying for an artist to tell viewers how to look at his work. But with Mr. Davis, and this deliciously select show of a half-dozen large paintings from 1961 to 1980, the instructions are entirely tolerable.

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Franklin EvansRepresented by Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

New York, New York - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce that Franklin Evans is now represented by the gallery. Evans' inaugural exhibition with the gallery will open on Thursday 5 June 2014.

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Iva Gueorguievaat ACME., by Christopher Knight

L.A. Times, September 13, 2013

Chaos has been called a science of surprises, and Iva Gueorguieva's paintings, drawings and relief-sculptures are nothing if not a rigorous embrace of the chaotic. But the turbulence in her work also seems as bracingly orchestrated as it is random and haphazard.

Six recent paintings on linen or paper and three relief constructions at ACME are anchored in the front room by a big triptych nearly 10 feet high and 15 feet wide. Visually, “Man Hunt” reads from left to right. Splintered shapes and whiplash lines of force pick up density and speed as your eye travels across the surface, but unexpected detours crop up along the way.

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Iva Gueorguievaat ACME., by Julia Friedman

Artforum, September 2013

Iva Gueorguieva’s current exhibition is replete with symbolism. The year referenced in the title of her acrylic and oil stick collage "Seated Woman: 1974," 2013, points to the ultimate origin of the piece: The Los Angeles–based artist was born in 1974 in Sofia, Bulgaria. Yet the work points to its art-historical origins as well: Seated Woman owes a great deal to Pablo Picasso, Umberto Boccioni, and Giacomo Balla. The largest work on view is the sixteen-foot collage "Man Hunt," 2013, a triptych whose panels merge into a complex design full of semiotic nods to a bustling metropolis. The work features an illusionistic torn portal, which also brings to mind another art-historical predecessor: Ilya Kabakov and his "The Man Who Flew into Space from His Apartment," 1988, an installation centered around an empty makeshift sling, from which the protagonist had just catapulted into the cosmos leaving behind a prosaic Soviet apartment. In both cases the viewer is left to contemplate the scene cluttered with markings and objects but with the man hunted and the man who flew long gone.

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Kevin AppelThe Ghost of Architecture: Recent and Promised Gifts

Henry Art Gallery, Univ. of Wash. 13 July - 29 September 2013

The Ghost of Architecture celebrates the addition of important works of art to the Henry’s permanent collection in the last five years.

Curated from recent gifts and promised gifts to the collection, the exhibition focuses on contemporary works that invoke architecture without citing it directly. Architecture or the architectural dimension is referenced by the artists in the show, either as a displaced or isolated fragment, as fantasy or folly, as the site of ordinary or extraordinary events, or as memory or the missing context in larger narratives.

Installation photography R.J. Sánchez

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Kevin Appel

Christopher Grimes Gallery, 13 September - 2 November 2013

Christopher Grimes Gallery is pleased announce an exhibition of new work by Kevin Appel. This will be Appel’s first exhibition with the gallery. Kevin Appel’s paintings explore the relationship between architecture and the painted image. Using photographs as a ground on which to build his painting, he applies layers of paint that act as screens, compressing the perceived space. The act of looking through one element to another, or the blocking of one impenetrable layer by another has become a hallmark of his paintings.

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Kevin AppelLevity/Gravity

IN/SITU: EXPO CHICAGO, 19 - 22 September 2013

EXPO CHICAGO, The International Exposition of Contemporary and Modern Art, is proud to announce the following list of artists that will participate in IN/SITU. Curated by Shamim M. Momin, Director, Curator, and co-founder of LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division), IN/SITU is a key element of the exposition's innovative artistic programming, providing the opportunity for exhibitors to showcase large-scale installations, site-specific and performative works by select international artists. Under the title, “Levity/Gravity,” the program includes work from Diana Al-Hadid, Kevin Appel, Sanford Biggers, Jose Dávila, Dan Gunn, Karl Haendel, Glenn Kaino, Andreas Lolis, Michael Rakowitz, Shinique Smith and Alec Soth.

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Robert MotherwellThe Early Collages

The Guggenheim Museum, 27 September 2013 - 5 January 2014

Devoted exclusively to papier collés and related works on paper from the 1940s and early 1950s by Robert Motherwell, this exhibition features nearly sixty artworks and examines the American artist's origins and his engagement with collage. The exhibition also honors Peggy Guggenheim's early patronage of the artist. At her urging, and under the tutelage of émigré Surrealist artist Matta, Motherwell first experimented with the papier collé technique. He recalled years later: "I might never have done it otherwise, and it was here that I found...my 'identity.'" By cutting, tearing, and layering pasted papers, Motherwell reflected the tumult and violence of the modern world, establishing him as an essential and original voice in postwar American art. Motherwell initially produced both figural and abstract collages, but by the early 1950s Surrealist influences prevalent in these first works had given way to his distinctive mature style, which was firmly rooted in Abstract Expressionism. "Robert Motherwell: Early Collages" will be presented at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, May 26 - September 8, 2013, before traveling to its second and final venue, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, September 27, 2013 - January 5, 2014.

This exhibition is organized by Susan Davidson, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

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Iva GueorguievaSpill / Frame

ACME., 6 September - 12 October 2013

ACME. is pleased to present "Spill / Frame," a solo exhibition of new paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Los Angeles based artist, Iva Gueorguieva. The exhibition will feature a new large-scale triptych painting titled "Man Hunt," as well as three additional paintings, three sculptural wall reliefs, and several works on paper. Whether working with painting, drawing or sculpture, Gueorguieva creates complex, frenetic environments by interweaving precise line drawings with strips of collage, textured rubbings of pigment, and large washes of color.

By physically and metaphorically cutting and bringing together disparate items and ideas in her paintings, drawings, and sculptures, Gueorguieva's works can be seen as assemblages of chaos and order, personal concerns and global issues. As the artist states, "to some extent we all do it, trying to make all this scattered matter fit."

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Iva GueorguievaIt's New, It's Now: Recent Gifts of Contemporary Prints and Drawings

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 14 July - 1 September 2013

It's New, It's Now. See iconic, eye-catching works by bold-faced names in the contemporary art world. Ranging in date from the 1960s to the present, this exhibition showcases more than 90 original works on paper.

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A Conversation with Kevin Appelby Julia Schwartz

Figure/Ground Communications, 28 June 2013

Kevin Appel was born in Los Angeles. He received his BFA from Parsons School of Design in 1990 and his MFA from the University of California in 1995. He is a Professor and Associate Chair of Graduate Studies at the University of California Irvine. His solo exhibitions include Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Culver City (2012); ACME Gallery, Los Angeles (2009); Two Rooms Gallery, Auckland (2008); Wilkinson Gallery, London (2006); Angles Gallery, Santa Monica (2006, 2002, 1999, 1998); Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City (2003); Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2001); and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1999). His work is included in MOMA, LACMA, MOCA, and Portland Art Museum in Oregon. He has an upcoming show at Christopher Grimes Gallery in September 2013. Appel maintains a studio in Los Angeles. 

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Rod PennerHyper Real - More than pop!

The Saarland.Museum | Modern Gallery, 30 June - 13 October 2013

The Saarland.Museum | Modern Gallery presents the exhibition Hyper Real - More than pop! featuring paintings and sculptures from 1967 to 2012 focusing on the photo-realistic movement. The exhibition is developed by Meinrad Maria Grewenig with Otto Last and the Institute for Cultural Exchange in cooperation with the legendary Louis K. Meisel Gallery New York.

 

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Kevin AppelPainting Two: The thick of it

Two Rooms Gallery, Auckland, NZ, 19 April - 18 May 2013

Two Rooms presents an exhibition celebrating the power of a material once basic to the artist: paint. At times neglected in an era of video, installation and conceptual art, paint has not gone away. All the artists in this group have a strong engagement both with its physical properties and its transformative potential.

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Kevin AppelPainting in Place

Los Angeles Nomadic Division, 22 May - 31 July 2013

Painting in Place is a group exhibition of contemporary painting which will be presented in the historic Farmers and Merchants Bank in Downtown Los Angeles (401 South Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90013).

The exhibition will present a wide array of work from contemporary artists that tackle painting from various perspectives, using both traditional and unconventional techniques and media in their approach to the discipline. Exploring various ways sculpture, and installation: blurred, deconstructed, and refigured.

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Kevin Appelrepresented by Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

New York, New York - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce its representation of Kevin Appel. Appel's inaugural exhibition with the gallery will open in the spring of 2014.

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Rod Penner

Museu del Tabac, 13 June - 20 October 2013

Rod Penner's hyperrealistic acrylic painting "Central Motel / Des Moines, NM" will be exhibited in a group show at the Museu del Tabac in Sant Julià de Lòria, Andorra. The exhibition will open on 13 June and will remain on view through October 20th, 2013.

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Becoming Hans Hofmannby Karen Wilkin

Art & Antiques Magazine, May 2013

Known best as an inspiring teacher before coming to America, he continued to teach in the U.S. and to codify the principles of his teaching in his writings, exerting considerable influence. The alumni of Hofmann’s Eighth Street school include such notable figures as Michael Goldberg, Alfred Jensen, Wolf Kahn, Lee Krasner, Robert de Niro Sr., Red Grooms, Paul Resika and many more. Hofmann’s lectures on art had a profound effect on some of the most significant members of the New York cultural scene; Arshile Gorky attended them and the critic Clement Greenberg always said that hearing Hofmann’s talks in 1938-39 was vital to the formation of his own uncompromising aesthetic. Yet engaged as Hofmann continued to be by teaching and writing after leaving Germany, and influential as his instruction and theories were, the most notable aspect of his American years was his refinding of his original identity, not as a teacher and theorist, but as a deeply engaged maker of art and a master manipulator of color.

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Iva GueorguievaReinvigorating Prints

The Washington Post, 26 April 2013

“Reinvigorating” is a mild word for what Iva Gueorguieva does in her large works, which combine collage, drawing and painting with nearly a dozen printmaking techniques. Those were developed, of course, to make multiples copies of a single original. But “Reinvigorating Prints,” at George Washington University’s Luther W. Brady Gallery, features one-of-a-kind works. The L.A. artist’s pieces are not finished when pulled from the press; she adds scraps of paper or fabric and garnished freely with ink, watercolor and oil and vinyl paint.

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Iva GueorguievaReinvigorating Prints

Luther W. Brady Art Gallery, 27 March - 3 May 2013

Iva Gueorguieva: Reinvigorating Prints will feature several large multi-media prints, completed at Graphicstudio, University of South Florida, that adapt the complicated and spontaneous nature of the artist’s paintings. Gueorguieva’s prints have been described as “pushing printmaking past its usual comfort zone. Spatially mesmerizing, kinetic and gestural.”

 

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Kevin AppelQ + A by Jill Singer

SightUnseen.com, 14 March 2013

Q+A with Kevin Appel, by Jill Singer

In the long list of ways that New York differs from Los Angeles, we’ve always been particularly fascinated by one: New York can be a very physically demanding place to live, but it is not a difficult city to understand on a psychological level. In Los Angeles, the living is easier, but there seems to be – especially among artists – a constant grappling to define and understand LA as a place. LA artist Kevin Appel explains it this way: “Los Angeles has always had a bit of an identity crisis partially due to the external view of LA as having this superficial mentality tied to the film industry. It doesn’t have a long lineage of a canonical or intellectual history, as opposed to New York.” He should know: Appel is a native Angeleno who has called the city home for almost his entire life – save for a brief stint at Parsons for his BFA – and he’s been steeped in the city’s history and vocabulary since birth. Growing up, his father was an architect and his mother an interior designer, so it makes sense that the city’s structures and surroundings would eventually become his subject matter.

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Robert MotherwellThe Early Collages

The Guggenheim Museum

Venice: 26 May - 8 September 2013

New York: 27 September 2013 - 5 January 2014

Devoted exclusively to papier collés and related works on paper from the 1940s and early 1950s by Robert Motherwell, this exhibition features nearly sixty artworks and examines the American artist's origins and his engagement with collage. The exhibition also honors Peggy Guggenheim's early patronage of the artist. At her urging, and under the tutelage of émigré Surrealist artist Matta, Motherwell first experimented with the papier collé technique. He recalled years later: "I might never have done it otherwise, and it was here that I found...my 'identity.'" By cutting, tearing, and layering pasted papers, Motherwell reflected the tumult and violence of the modern world, establishing him as an essential and original voice in postwar American art. Motherwell initially produced both figural and abstract collages, but by the early 1950s Surrealist influences prevalent in these first works had given way to his distinctive mature style, which was firmly rooted in Abstract Expressionism. "Robert Motherwell: Early Collages" will be presented at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, May 26 - September 8, 2013, before traveling to its second and final venue, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, September 27, 2013 - January 5, 2014.

This exhibition is organized by Susan Davidson, Senior Curator, Collections and Exhibitions, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

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Helen FrankenthalerBeyond the Sea by Karen Wilkin

Art & Antiques Magazine, March 2013

The late Helen Frankenthaler famously "departed" from Jackson Pollock with her early stain paintings in the 1950s, but she kept on making departures for the rest of her long, innovative career.

When Helen Frankenthaler died in December 2011, two weeks after her 83rd birthday, most tributes to her invoked "Mountains and Sea," the delicately colored, luminous stain paintings that she made in 1952, as a precocious 23-year old, a work that has come to define her almost as narrowly as "The Scream" defines Edvard Munch. Just about every article recounted, as well, the story of the powerful effect "Mountains and Sea" had on Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland, when they saw the picture in Frankenthaler's studio on a 1953 visit to New York, almost everyone quoted Louis' description of the seminal painting's young author as "the bridge between Pollock and what was possible."

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Esteban VicenteReview by Donald Kuspit

Artforum, March 2013

Esteban Vicente died in 2001, having lived to the ripe age of ninety-seven and worked to the end. It was not a bitter end, as his last paintings – thirteen of which were on view in this exhibition – indicate. Made between 1998 and 2000, these bright, colorful abstractions were inspired by the artist’s garden in Bridgehampton, New York, where he lived and worked. Among the flowers he planted were phlox, helianthus, foxgloves, daisies, and morning glories, all apparently in great abundance and carefully cultivated. Registering the effect of sunlight hitting the blossoms, the paintings are a sort of tachistic patchwork of quietly lyrical, atmospheric hues, sometimes amorphously spreading, sometimes striking and concentrated, like the red patches that suddenly appear as spontaneous accents in "Untitled," 1999.

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Tam Van Tran: Leaves of OreThe Review Panel

National Academy Museum, 1 March 2013

The Review Panel: An Evening of Critical Conversation About Art

Ellie Bronson, Jonathan Goodman and John Yau join moderator David Cohen to discuss Tam Van Tran, Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe; Shinique Smith, James Cohan Gallery; Ragnar Kjartansson, Luhring Augustine; and Bernard Frize, Pace Gallery. National Academy Museum, 1083 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street, New York from 6:30 to 8:00 PM.

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Tam Van Tran: Leaves of Ore IIThe ADAA Art Show

6 - 10 March 2013

New York, New York - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce a solo booth of work by Tam Van Tran at The Art Show, organized by the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) at the Park Avenue Armory, Park Avenue at 67th Street, New York, from 6 - 10 March. Gala Preview on 5 March.

In "Leaves of Ore II," Tam Van Tran begins with fragments such as porcelain shards that evoke memories of ceramic jars his mother used in Vietnam to make fish sauce and copper sheets that lift with air currents like palm fronds in the California Santa Ana winds. The fragments include found objects, cardboard and palm leaves as well as natural materials, clay, paint and paper. The materials come together and embody Tran's recalled experiences of bombs floating onto shore, villagers fishing with grenades, and intermittent evacuations. Acutely aware of himself as a Vietnamese-American absorbing both Eastern and Western cultural influences, Tran is an artist who actively considers, explores, and expands painting concepts.

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Hans Hofmann: Magnum OpusMuseum Pfalzgalerie Kaiserslautern

8 March - 16 June 2013

"Magnum Opus," an exhibition of works by Hans Hofmann, will open in Germany at the Museum Pfalzgalerie Kaiserslautern on 8 March and will remain on view through 16 June 2013.

Hans Hofmann trained in Munich and Paris, where he met artists such as Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris and George Rouault. The German-born Hofmann fully established himself as an artist in the United States in the 1930s. In 1930, Hofmann traveled to the United States, and until 1932 he taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles. Hofmann moved to New York in 1932 and taught at the Art Students League before opening the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts in 1933.

With highly successful art schools in New York and Provincetown, he exerted a lasting impact on an entire generation of American artists of the postwar period. Hofmann was the catalyst of the Abstract Expressionists and influenced painters such as Jackson Pollock, Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, Philip Guston, Robert Motherwell and Barnett Newman.

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Michael Reafsnyder: The Happy MediumArt in America, by Leah Ollman

December 2012

Ceramics are undergoing a revolution in the contemporary art world - but nowhere more so than in Los Angeles, where clay has a particularly resonant history.

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Rod Penner: Hyperrealism: 1967 - 2012Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza

22 March - 9 June 2013

In the late 1960s, the USA saw the emergence of a new trend in painting that focused on the realistic representation of scenes and objects from everyday American life. The artists involved always used photography as preliminary documentation for their works. This movement achieved its first recognition when it was shown at Documenta in Kassel in 1972. The exhibition to be held at the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in 2013 will offer the first complete survey of Hyperrealism. It will start with the great American artists of the first generation such as Richard Estes, John Baeder, Robert Bechtle, Tom Blackwell, Chuck Close and Robert Cottingham, then move on to Hyperrealism in Europe and to artists of subsequent generations. Many of the works on display will be loaned from the collection of Louis K. Meisel, whose gallery has become the focal point of the movement. Meisel promoted Hyperrealism from its outset both within and outside the USA, supporting and discovering new artists. His gallery continues to be the key reference point for this trend today.

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Tam Van Tran: Pattern: Follow the RulesBroad Art Museum

22 March - 23 June 2013

Pattern is currently being reinvigorated as a significant space for artistic innovation. Each artist presented here begins with some system or set of rules, whether mechanical, technological, digital, or other, and, through rigorous repetitive action, creates objects that are equally rigorous in their optical repetition. With this comes a critical redefinition of pattern: These artists explore iterative generation of form, using a framework more akin to a mathematical pattern or a computer pattern than to a purely visual process focused on decoration or ornamentation. Yet the resulting compositions are highly decorative, visually dynamic, and spectacularly patterned in the traditional sense of the term. Importantly, in these works the limitation of artistic choice implied by following a set of rules does not lead to a limited or stripped down final effect. Rather, the reliance on a circumscribed mechanism of production often results in a sense of potential endlessness that forces us to examine our preconceptions about the distance between reality and visual illusion. Regardless of the mode of making or the content within the form, each work in the exhibition asks us to reevaluate the way we see and experience the spaces we are in, the objects we confront, and the relationship between vision and perception.

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Michael Reafsnyder: Into the LightThe Marjorie Barrick Museum

12 December 2012 - 31 January 2013

The Las Vegas Art Museum's Collections comes back "Into the Light"

So there it was. Amid the single-serving shrimp cocktails, bite-sized quiche, wine, hugs, polite conversations, photo-ops, artists, writers, gallerists and well-heeled art collectors, lived the one single truth: We've been given another chance.

Through careful negotiation, more that a year of planning and a major revamping of UNLV's Barrick Museum, the partnership between the Las Vegas Art Museum and the university's College of Fine Arts came to fruition Tuesday night at the reception for "Into the Light," featuring a large chunk of the Las Vegas Art Museum's permanent collection.

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Robert Motherwell on Art.syThe Dedalus Foundation: Printing a Catalogue Raisonné

In May of 2012, Jack Flam, Katy Rogers, and Tim Clifford traveled to Verona, Italy to complete their decade-long project of researching and publishing "Robert Motherwell Paintings and Collages: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1941-1991." Over the course of a month, the three authors worked with master printers at Trifolio, overseeing the printing process of the three-volume set. This video follows the finishing stages of production on the catalogue raisonné from proofing the color to binding the final product.

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Frederick Hammersley: The Computer Drawings 1969L.A. Louver

17 January 2013 - 23 February 2013

L.A. Louver is pleased to present an exhibition of computer drawings created in 1969 by Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009). Hammersley used early computer technology to make these drawings, a process that became pivotal to his artistic development.

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Rebecca Campbell: Don't Be Shy, Don't Hold BackThe Logan Collection at SFMOMA

8 December 2012 - 2 June 2013

Showcasing nearly 40 major works from the 1960s to the 1990s, this exhibition celebrates the 15th anniversary of a gift of contemporary art from renowned collectors Vicki and Kent Logan that took SFMOMA's collection in bold new directions. The presentation spotlights pieces by Chuck Close, Philip Guston, Anselm Kiefer, Bruce Nauman, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol that form the foundation of the Logan collection. It also brings together artists working in New York in the 1980's, such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Felix Gonzaelz-Torres, Jeff Koons, and Cady Noland; "Young British Artists" like Tracey Emin and Damien Hirst; and Chinese and Japanese artists including Gu Wenda and Takashi Murakami, for a gathering of late-20th-century art that is stellar in quality and distinctively international in perspective.

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Art After DeathThe Huffington Post, by Rebecca Campbell

16 January 2013

On January 13, 2012, Josephine Valentine and Andromeda Jane were born at 33 weeks and five days old. Thirty-three weeks isn’t very premature these days in the world of prematurity, so I expected they may spend a month in the NICU and then we would welcome them to our chaotic, happy home. That wasn’t our story.

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Suzanne CaporaelArt in America

20 December 2012

The Lookout: A Weekly Guide to Shows You Won't Want to Miss

With an ever-growing number of galleries scattered around New York, it's easy to feel overwhelmed. Where to begin?

Here at A.i.A., we are always on the hunt for thought-provoking, clever and memorable shows that stand out in a crowded field. Below is a selection of current shows our team of editors can't stop talking about.

Suzanne Caporael at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, through Dec. 22 The various ways we mediate our world have long been the concern of painter Suzanne Caporael, who can give the most esoteric taxonomies for processing nature, in particular, a lyrical twist. Her means are whatever it takes - be that abstraction or representation, leaving her "signature style" tricky to summarize. In her multifaceted show "Seeing Things," she considers the gap between perception and cognition in angular and gridded abstractions, delicate landscapes and veiled allusions to such masterpieces as Cezanne's portrait of his wife and Watteau's "Pierrot."

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Full Bluhm: Discovering Norman BluhmArt & Antiques Magazine, by John Dorfman

November 2012

Norman Bluhm is the greatest Abstract Expressionist painter you've never heard of. Or if you have heard of him, you're part of a select group of aficionados who appreciate the multifaceted, challenging work of a painter who refused to be pinned down to any one school or style and kept working regardless of the shifting tides of the market and art-critical opinion.

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Esteban Vicente: Portrait of the ArtistParrish Art Museum

Ongoing

Esteban Vicente’s death in 2001 at the age of 97 marked the passing of one of the last surviving members of the first generation of New York School painters. He arrived in America in 1936, schooled in the old world academic tradition of his native Spain and fresh from a sojourn in the heady milieu of 1920s Paris.

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Hans Hofmann Paints A PictureARTnews, by Elaine De Kooning

November 2012, originally appeared in February 1950

"Making a picture is almost a physical struggle," says Hans Hofmann, whose prodigious nervous energy is communicated in the expanding dimensions and exuberant colors of his abstractions. Working with astonishing speed, never sitting down, constantly in motion between his palette and his easel, applying his paint with broad, lunging gestures, Hofmann often finishes a painting in a few hours.

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Rosana Castrillo DiazAnthony Meier Fine Arts

16 November - 19 December 2012

Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Rosana Castrillo Diaz. In her third solo show at the gallery, Castrillo Diaz debuts a series of three-dimensional wall works that continue parallel dialogues with light and shadow, visibility, surface and materials.

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Liat Yossifor's 'Thought Patterns' Trace The Image of Thinking And A Moment UndoneHuffington Post

10 November 2012

Imagine someone traced their finger in the snow, switching between communicating a secret message and showcasing seemingly random scribbles. Now replace snow with gobs of gray oil paints, and you have the work of Liat Yossifor.

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An Interview with Liat YossiforI Call It Oranges

21 October 2012

Liat Yossifor gets up very early and paints by natural light, details that gain significance once you know she works on Hollywood Blvd -- prone to late night revelry and not known for really anything natural at all. On her doorstep, as you wait to be buzzed in and up to her studio, you can have your picture photo-shopped into a picture with Lady Gaga in the adjacent bodega. Hotdogs rotate on a spit. On your right and left are the stars of Dennis Day and Cathy Downs, two names distant enough to be a lesson in how quickly fame fades. Downs was once Clementine in "My Darling Clementine," which I only know as the film that gets interrupted during an episode of M.A.S.H. It was Colonel Potter’s favorite movie. The star directly in front of Yossifor’s building is blank.

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Hans Hofmann Paints A PictureARTnews November 2012

by Elaine De Kooning, originally appeared in February 1950

...Hofmann has evolved no rules for the making of a picture. On the contrary, always on guard against intellectualism and virtuosity, he says: "At the time of making a picture, I want not to know what I'm doing; a picture should be made with feeling, not with knowing. The possibilities of the medium must be sensed. Anything can serve as a medium - kerosene, benzine, turpentine, linseed oil, beeswax...even beer," he adds jokingly.

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Judy PfaffRobischon Gallery

20 September - 22 December 2012

By Michael Paglia Now, on to the shows at hand. There's definitely been a buzz about "Judy Pfaff" at Robischon Gallery, a spectacular in-depth solo stretching into several of the exhibition rooms at the remarkably capacious venue. It is every bit as gorgeous as "El Anatsui" over at the DAM - and that's really saying something.

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City Of WomenReview of "To Be a Lady" by Thomas Micchelli

There is something ineffably comforting about "To Be a Lady," the exhibition curated by Jason Andrew and subtitled "Forty-Five Women in the Arts." The second time I visited the show, on a misty, autumnal afternoon, the light-filled bays at 1285 Avenue of the Americas seemed to lead back to a once intimate, now forgotten place.

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Oliver ArmsOrange County Museum of Art

7 October - 30 December 2012

As part of the museum's 50th anniversary celebrations, OC Collects presents curated selections from more than a dozen of the most important private collections in our community. Since the museum's founding in 1962, collectors in Orange County have been among the most supportive and adventurous champions of modern and contemporary art, although this is little known or acknowledged within the broader artworld. The exhibition will include major paintings, sculptures, photographs and videos ranging from classic modern works to emerging artists of the present moment.

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"Stone Gravy" in ARTnewsby Christopher French

October 2012

Los Angeles-based critic David Pagel grouped six painters and three sculptors from the West and East coasts inspired by the "Stone Soup" fable, titling it "Stone Gravy." Exhibiting the austerity of abstract formalism (represented by stone), leavened and enriched by sensory overloads of color, texture, and pattern (standing for the gravy), were the painters Brad Eberhard, Annie Lapin, Kim MacConnel, Allison Miller, Richard Allen Morris, and David Reed. Sculptors Polly Apfelbaum, Ron Nagle, and Matt Wedel, by contrast, argued for expanding sensory delight beyond the strictures of wall-mounted rectangular planes.

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Rod Penner: Painted Illusions: Hyperrealism 1967 - 2012Kunsthalle Tubingen

8 December 2012 - 10 March 2013

Rod Penner's hyperrealist paintings will be exhibited in a six-venue museum exhibition titled "Painted Illusions: Hyperrealism 1967-2012." The exhibition begins in Tubingen, Germany at the Kunsthalle Tubingen and will be there from 8 December 2012 to 10 March 2013.

Markus Linnenbrink: so here's what you gonna doFiedler Taubert Contemporary, Berlin

11 September - 27 October 2012


Wolf Kahn: A Lecture on Planning and Spontaneity in ArtBrattleboro Museum & Art Center

7 October 2012

Planning and Spontaneity in Art A Lecture by Wolf Kahn at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center 7 October 2012 Wolf Kahn is a leading figure in American art. His rich, expressive body of work represents a synthesis of his modern abstract training with Hans Hofmann, the palette of Matisse, Rothko’s sweeping bands of color, and the atmospheric qualities of American Impressionism. Kahn has received many honors and awards, and his work is held in the collections of major museums worldwide.

www.brattleboromuseum.org


Robert Motherwell: Beside the SeaProvincetown Art Association and Museum

20 July - 30 September 2012

This exhibition is the Provincetown Art Association Museum's first major exhibition of Robert Motherwell's work created in the summer of 1942 in the artist's studio in Cape Cod, curated by Lise Motherwell and Dan Ranalli.

 www.paam.org


Gene Davis: Abstract DrawingsSmithsonian American Art Museum

15 June 2012 - 6 January 2013

Abstract Drawings presents a selection of forty-six works on paper from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s permanent collection that are rarely on public display. From simple sketches to highly finished compositions, these works represent the rich possibilities of abstraction as a mode of artistic expression.

www.americanart.si.edu


Judy Pfaff: To Be A Lady: Forty Five Women in the ArtsNorte Maar and 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery

19 September 2012 - 18 January 2013

Curated by Jason Andrew Organized by Norte Maar Sponsored by the ownership at 1285 Avenue of the Americas Norte Maar and the 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery announce the exhibition To be a Lady: Forty-Five Women in the Arts, on view at the 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery from September 24, 2012 through January 18, 2013. A reception, open to the public, will be held on Monday, September 24 from 6-8pm.

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Judy Pfaff: Artists Choose ArtistsFlomenhaft Gallery

13 September - 27 October 2012

Balancing intense planning with improvisational decision-making, Judy Pfaff creates sprawling sculptures and installations that weave landscape, architecture, and color into a tense yet organic whole. A pioneer of installation art since the 1970s, Pfaff synthesizes sculpture, painting, and architecture into dynamic environments, in which space expands and collapses, fluctuating between the two- and three-dimensional achieving lightness and explosive energy.

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Patrick Wilson: PullCalifornia State University, Long Beach Art Museum

8 September - 9 December, 2012

University Art Museum (UAM) at California State University Long Beach will present twelve radiant new and recent geometric abstract paintings in Patrick Wilson: Pull. Wilson’s intricately layered compositions wed glowing color fields to structured shapes. Transparent squares, rectangles and narrow lines of acrylic paint draw the viewer into the pulsating depths of his fresh artworks. Three works on paper from the 2008 series, Suite for Mount Washington, will also be included in the exhibition. These gouache serigraphs, made under the master printer Christian Zickler, directly influenced the complex visual syntax that presently informs his current painting practice.

 

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Thomas BurkeNew Paintings at Western Project, Los Angeles, CA

8 September - 6 October, 2012

Western Project is proud to present our second exhibition of paintings by Thomas Burke. Originally from Boulder City, Nevada and a graduate of University of Nevada at Las Vegas, Burke has been a resident of Brooklyn, New York since 2005. As a cerebral painter, this body of work continues his interest in systems, minimalism, and Op Art from the 1960s and 70s; with the computer as a drawing tool, his images also explore contemporary graphic design, digital technology and the history of hard-edged abstract, geometric painting.

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Rebecca CampbellThe 2012 Pacific Northwest College of Art Juried Alumni Exhibition: For Life

5 September - 22 October, 2012

This juried exhibition will provide a rare opportunity for PNCA and the broader Portland cultural community to see the scope of contemporary art, craft, and design by alumni from PNCA’s Bachelor of Fine Arts, Master of Fine Arts, and Continuing Education certificate programs. What’s more, it offers the viewer the opportunity to become an institutional archaeologist, to dig down through the accumulated strata of object, image, and idea to get at the cultural DNA of the College. For alumni, it is an appropriate homecoming. The mater in alma mater doesn’t translate as “mother” for nothing. How long has it been since you visited your mother? Would she even recognize you? click here : www.pnca.edu

Judy PfaffA Survey: 1979-2012: Thick and Thin

The Huntington Museum of Art, 16 June - 26 August

Including 38 works spanning Judy Pfaff's career, from early works on paper to contemporary paper collages, installations and sculpture. click here : www.hmoa.org

Patrick WilsonLocal Color

San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA 26 July - 13 December, 2012

Local Color is drawn from the San Jose Museum of Art's permanent collection and explores the privacy of color in a range of works. This exhibition encourages viewers to look at color as content and features the work of Josef Albers, Fletcher Benton, Ellen Carey, Mary Corse, Tony DeLap, Sam Francis, Sonia Gechtoff, James Hayward, Paul Jenkins, Amy Kaufman, Markus Linnenbrink, Nathan Oliveira, Raimonds Strapans, Amy Trachtenberg and Patrick Wilson, among others. click here : www.sjmusart.org

Iva Gueorguieva: "Recoiling Earth"L.A. Times, by Leah Ollman

20 July 2012

Once inside a painting by Iva Gueorguieva, it's hard to leave. It's hard to want to leave. The surfaces, colors, shapes all clamor for attention, whisking the eye on a brisk, pinball course in disparate directions, then granting it moments of reprieve, small sanctuaries of brooding beauty.

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Liat Yossifor: 80 Days: A Declaration of CustomsTorrance Art Museum

A hypothetical touring exhibition of one-night-only presentations – each in a different country, 12 in all, over 80 days - that will showcase the original LA based artists selected and adding a new artist from each location worldwide where the exhibition was to be presented. The original project was cancelled due to logistical funding issues and this show is a response to the financial difficulties affecting artists and their ability to exhibit abroad in economically challenged times.

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Wolf Kahn's New YorkThe New York Sun, by Franklin Einspruch

17 July 2012

One usually associates the name of Wolf Kahn with New England landscapes, but his economically painterly treatment suits the urban fabric as ably. Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe has put together a show of his New York images to prove it.

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Patrick WilsonSlow Motion Action Painting at Marx & Zavattero

June 2 - July 14, 2012

Los Angeles painter Patrick Wilson presents a magnificent new body of his brilliantly constructed, abstract acrylic on canvas paintings in his highly anticipated third solo exhibition Slow Motion Action Painting at Marx & Zavattero, June 2 - July 14, 2012. Wilson’s paintings are conceived with the ideas of beauty and pleasure at the forefront. As the title of the exhibition suggests, Wilson is inviting his viewers to enter the gallery, and then consciously slow down in order to actively experience his work in the same manner in which it was created.

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Iva Gueorguieva: Recoiling EarthSusanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

14 July - 23 August 2012

Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects is pleased to present new paintings and three-dimensional works by Iva Gueorguieva in galleries 3 and 4.

Gueorguieva's work, while simultaneously indebted to the history of gestural abstraction and distancing itself from that history, is committed to the idea that gesture in painting can carry information that is neither simply graphic nor subjective, but that this gesture can have an active relationship with the real world.

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David PagelEST-3: South California in New York: Los Angeles Art From the Beth Rudin DeWoody Collection

Parrish Art Museum, 4 March - 17 June 2012

EST–3 focuses on Los Angeles art in the New York collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody. Its title (Eastern Standard Time Minus Three) is a playful rejoinder to Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980, a Getty-initiated series of more than 60 exhibitions across Southern California that examines the emergence of Los Angeles as an art center. Starting on the opposite end of the country, and looking across three time zones, EST–3 avoids the tempestuousness of local dramas and the hyperbole of hometown boosterism to present a cool, wide-ranging view of art made in Los Angeles over a 40-year period of unprecedented development. 

www.parrishart.org


Patrick Wilson, 'Action Painting' in Slow MotionSan Francisco Chronicle, by Kenneth Baker.

June 16, 2012

Complicating things does not necessarily enrich them. But the newly complex work of Los Angeles painter Patrick Wilson at Marx & Zavattero extends the range of subtlety and ambiguity that has always given his art substance.

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Iva GueorguievaFellowship from the Orange County Collectors Organization

June 2012

The Directors of Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe would like to congratulate Iva Gueorguieva on receiving the 2012 Fellowship from the Orange County Collectors Organization.

Tam Van Tranrepresented by Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

29 May 2012

New York, New York - Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe is pleased to announce its representation of Tam Van Tran. Tran’s inaugural exhibition with the gallery will open on 14 February 2013 and run through 16 March 2013.

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Robert MotherwellThe Essential Idea: Robert Motherwell's Graphic Works

Asheville Art Museum, Asheville, NC, 10 May - 26 August 2012

Special Reception and Lecture: With esteemed Motherwell scholar, Mary Ann Caws Thursday, May 10, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. Prints rarely receive the same attention as paintings. Yet printmaking is a demanding medium, one that requires extensive technical knowledge and collaboration. Robert Motherwell was unusual among his Abstract Expressionist contemporaries because of his interest in and mastery of printmaking.

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Kim MacConnelReview in Art in America

May 8, 2012

This mini-survey of Kim MacConnel's unstretched fabric paintings from the 1970s, and a terrific one from 2004, is the first of four shows at Salomon this spring collectively titled "American Responses: Pleasure, Reverence, Heart, Home." The successive exhibitions feature work by MacConnel, Ned Smyth, Dickie Landry and Tina Girouard, artists from different parts of the country who were making seminal work in the 1970s and '80s, and who are still active.

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George McNeilReview in Art in America

28 March 2012

NEW YORK An exhibition of work by the under-known New York School painter George McNeil (1908–1995) is always a cause for celebration. This one was of particular interest, centering as it did on a group of canvases made between 1960 and 1968, when McNeil began to introduce figural elements into his abstract compositions. A contemporary of Jackson Pollock, McNeil was less famous than some of his Abstract Expressionist peers, and became even less so as the decades passed. He had a long and respectable career, nevertheless. In the 1930s, after studying with Jan Matulka and Hans Hofmann, McNeil cofounded the American Abstract Artists group. In the early 1950s, he was among Charles Egan Gallery’s original stable of artists, which also included Willem de Kooning—who was a fan—and Franz Kline. McNeil’s paintings from this time resemble satellite images, with fat, snaking lines like rivers or roadways enclosing heavily worked areas of color. By the 1960s, these topographies gave way first to discrete central forms and then to abstracted human figures.

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Suzanne CaporaelThe New Yorker

4 April 2012

These small collages are composed by the painter as studies for her larger canvases, but it’s hard to imagine that their successors could trump them in terms of spontaneity or sheer joie de vivre. Made from pieces of newsprint, in saturated hues of magenta, lime, orange, and navy, they are winningly simple with a powerful graphic punch—the abstract cousins of Saul Bass’s posters circa “Anatomy of a Murder.” But that mod sixties vibe is belied by the newspaper dates; the oldest is from 2008. Through April 21.

www.newyorker.com


Liat Yossifor & Helen DeSanctis: I'd Be Safe and WarmRoyale Projects

31 March - 29 April 2012

Royale Projects opens an exhibition featuring two Los Angeles based artists that create powerful works, atypical of west coast abstract paintings. The title of the exhibition, “I’d be safe and warm”, is taken from the Mamas and the Papas song “California Dreamin’”. Papa John Phillips shares a vivid and romantic vision of a winter day in New York City. Dreaming of a warmer and more welcoming environment, he adopts a false spirituality to momentarily find shelter from his bitter surroundings. Similarly Helen DeSanctis and Liat Yossifor seem to long for a distant place while skillfully capturing the cold reality of where they are.

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Frederick Hammersleyat L.A. Louver

22 March - 12 May 2012

There are dozens of painting exhibitions on view in March, and Los Angeles looks particularly strong. In late March, LA Louver will open an exhibition of work the by the late abstract painter Frederick Hammersley. Based in New Mexico for the latter part of this life, Hammersley's paintings are potent and lyric distillations of paintings' most basic elements. He simultaneously worked in two modes that he referred to a "Geometrics" and "Organics." While his inclusion in Site Santa Fe more than a decade ago brought his work to wider attention, Hammersley is still, in my mind, an under-recognized artist...a true must see. --The Huffington Post 

www.huffingtonpost.com

www.lalouver.com


Michael Reafsnyderat R.B. Stevenson Gallery

San Diego Art Guide, 22 March 2012

Michael Reafsnyder emphasizes the dynamic characteristics of acrylic paint with his masterful ability to manipulate the water-based medium in his recent work on display at R.B. Stevenson Gallery in La Jolla. He fills the canvas with layers of complex hues and expressive strokes of color that flow through the canvas, forming interesting clusters of colors at the intersections.

Echoing the multi-faceted properties of the paint, Reafsnyder uses multiple sizes of pallet knives and sometimes found objects, “I don’t like cleaning brushes…I use anything but a brush.” Amazingly, he is able to keep the colors from mixing or turning into a muddled brown.

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Frederick HammersleyIt's Hammersley Time: This Artweek.LA

Huffington Post, 20 March 2012

Hammersley's paintings are abstract, richly colored and possess a quietly resolute determination. They do not represent anything in the traditional sense; rather they suggest complex emotional states and patterns of thought. Their seemingly clear and simple compositions belie their pictorial richness. Hammersley's abstractions came out of drawing. While teaching at Jepson Art School in Los Angeles, he found "a delicious stone" to create intimate lithographic prints (each 3 x 3 inches) based on a grid structure of 16 squares. He introduced compositional elements one by one, altering line, form, color, etc. to discover how each would react to the other. These small prints held the seeds for his later geometric paintings. After leaving Jepson in 1951, Hammersely recalled that he "bumped into hunch painting by accident," inspired by the shapes that he saw in the figure and in still-life, reducing them to elemental form. These were intuitively derived compositions that gained the attention of curator, Jules Langsner, who included Hammersley in the landmark 1959 exhibition, Four Abstract Classicists, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

www.huffingtonpost.com


Suzanne Caporael: Real, and CaporaelThe New York Sun

13 March 2012

Two exhibitions open this Thursday at Ameringer McEnery Yohe. Both of them merit your attention and attendance.

One of them features the work of Suzanne Caporael. "First and foremost, Caporael is a painter," says the gallery. "While maintaining a discrete distance from the art world in various rural havens, she has nonetheless earned herself a place in the field of contemporary painting. For nearly thirty years she has allowed her avid curiosity to guide her through a variety of disparate areas of study, most of which take two to five years of research and manifest as paintings while Caporael delves more deeply into her sources. These include eighty paintings representing thousands of miles of back roads traveled in the U.S. over a period of four years. Always remaining more allusive than descriptive, the work balances substance and subtlety with aesthetic rigor."

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Hans Hofmann: Real, and CaporaelThe New York Sun

13 March 2012

Two exhibitions open this Thursday at Ameringer McEnery Yohe. Both of them merit your attention and attendance. ... The other is "Hans Hofmann: Art Like Life is Real." The gallery continues, "In his essay for the exhibition catalogue, William Agee describes Hofmann as going against the grain of the artistic canon of the day; 'His art was too big, too bold, to be encapsulated in a few years after 1945, the years we generally identify as the heyday of abstract expressionism.' Instead, Hofmann preferred to search for what he believed to be the real in art, stretching it beyond the confines of a signature image. This exhibition offers a selection of his divergent poly-referential works spanning a period of 1944 through 1962." Don't maintain a discrete distance from Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe this week - seek instead to close it.

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Patrick WilsonThe Brooklyn Rail, by Corina Larkin

March, 2012

Patrick Wilson is on a self-professed quest for beauty in the realm of color and form. His search takes him back to 20th-century abstract colorists and reaches forward into contemporary, technology-dominated, urban life. Such rigorous study of color relationships, careful observation of artificial and natural light, and references to technological motifs yield complex and sublime results.

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Iva GueorguievaCalifornia Art, Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation,

4 March - 20 May, 2012

Frederick R. Weisman was a pioneering Los Angeles art collector whose rise as an important patron of the arts paralleled the emergence of the contemporary art scene in Southern California. Featured are works ranging from the 1960s to the present, including diverse movements such as California Pop Art, Hard-Edge Abstraction and Light and Space.

www.carnegieam.org


Michael ReafsnyderGleam

R.B. Stevenson Gallery, March 3 - April 7, 2012

R.B. Stevenson Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new paintings by Los Angeles artist Michael Reafsnyder. This is Michael Reafsnyder's 3rd solo exhibition at the R.B. Stevenson Gallery.

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Wolf KahnBrattleboro Pastels

Brattleboro Museum, 28 September 2011 - 5 February 2012

Wolf Kahn spends much of his summer sketching in pastel in and around Brattleboro, Vermont, later refining the sketches in his hilltop studio. BMAC is honored to present a portion of his summer 2011 artistic production.

Pastel is Kahn’s generative medium. I use the term generative not to imply that his pastels are sketches for paintings — though they may be. Rather, the mark a pastel stick makes, the way its powder sits on the page, its texture, its effects are the genesis of his painting style. Kahn has often referred to his painting technique as scrubbing: he makes dry, quick lines, atop thinly layered veils of color, essentially transferring his touch with pastel to paint. His virtuosic handling of the medium he calls “dust on butterfly wings” informs and expands all his artistic endeavors.

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Judy PfaffRecent Work, Bruno David Gallery, St. Louis, MO

January 27 – March 3, 2012

Bruno David Gallery is pleased to present Judy Pfaff‘s first solo exhibition in St. Louis since her exhibition Currents 41 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in 1989.

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Rebecca CampbellSeeing Is Believing: Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth

3 September 2011 - 23 January 2012

Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth both spent their childhoods in Utah and within the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Their different experiences and individual reactions to this specific context have inspired much of their mature work as artists. Multilayered and complex, their works touch on memory and nostalgia but are grounded in the present and the reinterpretation of their experiences as well as Mormon traditions and practices. This exhibition will include painting, sculpture and installations.

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Rebecca Campbell"Doublespeak"

Salt Lake Art Center, 7 October 2011 - 7 January 2012

Doublespeak features artworks by an international roster of contemporary women artists who utilize strategies of layered or multiple meanings to address politically, sexually or socially difficult subject matter. This exhibition will examine feminine perspectives on politics, war and gender, including exploration of the role of women as authors, victims, bystanders, soldiers, commentators, and caretakers. Each of the artists in Doublespeak comes from a perspective of dual-identity in one way or another (in terms of culture, religion, sexual identity, etc.).

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George McNeilArt in America, "The Lookout: A Weekly Guide to Shows You Won't Want to Miss"

January 2012

This is a chance to see a generous selection of McNeil's robust abstractions, mainly from the '60s. In each work, a surprisingly broad palette is applied in boldly brushed strokes and passages. The raucous figuration of the artist's later work is suggested-but here we understand the pure energy that would animate his later work.

www.artinamericamagazine.com


Helen Frankenthaler1928 - 2011

December 27, 2011

The Directors of Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe mourn the passing of a true American visionary. Helen Frankenthaler's life and art produced a remarkable body of work that inspired an artistic movement and continues to inspire new generations of artists and viewers in her unique pursuit of truth and beauty. We will miss your grace and friendship but just need to look at your paintings to find the source of your spirit and the joy you have brought to us. Will Ameringer Miles McEnery James Yohe

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Michael ReafsnyderDelight

Marty Walker Gallery, November 19 - December 23, 2011

Marty Walker Gallery presents deftly boisterous abstract paintings by California artist Michael Reafsnyder for his first exhibition in Dallas, Texas. Part drip, smear, scrape, and drizzle, part color-field, purely intuitive, intellectual and largely frenetic, the nest of colors vibrate beyond the canvas and invite a playful entry. Layers of paint are drawn across the surface like strata of earth in different perspectives in vibrant, unblended hues, cut up and left on the canvas like scraps. Inspired by abstract expressionism, the paintings blend intuitive process with child-like discoveries of the COBRA avant-garde group, cleansing the angst and subconscious monsters with his ever-present, smiley-face signature.

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Frederick Hammersley: Experiments in Abstraction: Art in Southern California, 1945 - 1980The San Diego Museum of Art

26 November - 19 February 2012

Experiments in Abstraction: Art in Southern California, 1945 to 1980, addresses a generation of California-based artists who explored the possibilities of abstraction. In the years following World War II, a distinctive style of art, identified as Hard-Edge painting, was developed by pioneering artists such as Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson, Oskar Fischinger, Helen Lundeberg, and John McLaughlin.

In 1959 Los Angeles Times art critic Jules Langsner coined the term “Hard-Edge Painting” to describe the work of these California painters. Partly a reaction against Abstract Expressionism, best known in the thickly layered paintings of American artists Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, Hard-Edge emphasized angular lines, reduced forms, precise surfaces, and rich colors. The resulting aesthetic is forever associated with mid-century California Modernism. Beyond the pioneering Hard-Edge painters, other California-based artists, including Charles Arnoldi, Sam Francis, and Ed Ruscha, continued to experiment and transform abstraction on the West Coast.

This exhibition, which includes works from the Museum’s permanent collection and some local loans, explores the diversity of Post-War abstraction in Southern California.


Rebecca CampbellPhoenix New Times: Angela Ellsworth and Rebecca Campbell's Dual Exhibition Re-Creates History

November 18, 2011

Visiting the show "Seeing Is Believing: Rebecca Campbell and Angela Ellsworth," now on display at the Phoenix Art Museum, I have to descend a small flight of steps, which seems somehow fitting in a weird way. Fitting because this is a show about descent of a kind — mainly, lineage or ancestry. But it's also a show about the passing down of memories that manifest the past. 

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Patrick Wilson"Good Barbecue"

Susanne Vielmetter L.A. Projects, 10 September - 5 November 2011

Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new paintings by Los Angeles based artist Patrick Wilson in galleries 3 and 4. On view will be a range of new paintings in which Wilson continues to translate color and light into luminous and flawlessly calibrated abstractions. Wilson's technique is straightforward - using drywall blades, rollers and masking tape he moves color around in controlled areas. The resulting compositions are elaborately layered squares, rectangles and lines of stunning color and radiance. Alternating between surfaces where the paint has been rolled on and where translucent layers are being pulled repeatedly over the surface, Wilson crates a spectacle of great beauty, in which the painting alternately offers resistance to the eye or pulls the viewer into glowing fields of brilliant depth.

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Nancy GravesTexas Gallery, Paintings and Sculptures of the 1980's

8 September 8 - 30 October 2011

Throughout her life, Nancy Graves (1939 -1995) had a long relationship with Texas, and Houston in particular, so it is with great pride and pleasure that Texas Gallery brings her work back to Houston in an exhibition of both paintings and sculptures from a major period in her career. In cooperation with The Nancy Graves Foundation, Texas Gallery will exhibit a selected group of paintings and cast bronze sculptures from the 1980s from September 8 through October 29, 2011. Rarely has any artist been able to meld the formal concerns and mediums of painting and sculpture into seamless harmony in the manner of Nancy Graves.

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Iva GueorguievaOpening reception October 1, 6-9pm

Heriard-Cimino Gallery, October 1 - October 29


Hans Hofmann: The Tides of ProvincetownThe New Britain Museum of American Art

15 July - 16 October 2011

This exhibition will focus on Provincetown's legacy as an art colony, and will cover over 100 artists from Charles W. Hawthorne's founding of the Cape Cod School of Art in 1899 to the present day. This will be the largest and most comprehensive survey of the art colony completed in over 40 years.

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Judy PfaffSamuel Dorsky Museum of Art

15 October 2011

NEW PALTZ – The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art will celebrate its 10th anniversary on Saturday, October 15. The Dorsky first opened to the public in April 2001 and was officially dedicated on October 20, 2001. The events of next weekend will honor past Hudson Valley Master artists Lesley Dill, Robert Morris, Don Nice, Judy Pfaff and Carolee Schneemann. click here : http://www.midhudsonnews.com

Iva GueorguievaVertical Hold: Iva Gueorguieva and Julie Weitz

9 September - 15 October 2011

This two-person exhibition is the culmination of an unfolding visual dialogue between artists Iva Gueorguieva and Julie Weitz, as each considers the relationship between time, body and painting. In this exchange of influence, Gueorguieva takes on Weitz's reoccurring theme of the mask and existentially rich nature of the reflection, and Weitz adapts Gueorguieva's implied figuration and propensity for vertical structure. The two artists encounter each other in their insistence on the body as both subject and field, and their consideration of time in the experience of looking.

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Frederick HammersleyArtistic Evolution: Southern California Artists at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

2 October 2011 - 15 January 2012

Artistic Evolution is inspired by works that were shown at NHM when it was the Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science, and Art, the first dedicated museum building in Los Angeles. The Exposition Park museum historically played a crucial role in nurturing the dynamism and richness of the Los Angeles art scene. In the mid 1960s, art exhibitions were moved from the Museum to the new Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Wilshire Boulevard, and NHM focused its mission on natural history.

www.nhm.org


Wolf KahnBrattleboro Pastels, Opening reception & Book-Signing

Brattleboro Museum, Saturday 1 October 2011, 5 -7PM

Be among the first to view the new exhibit Wolf Kahn: Brattleboro Pastels, featuring new work created this summer in southern Vermont by one of America’s most influential and admired landscape artists. Kahn will be on hand to sign books, limited-edition prints, catalogues, posters, and more. Cash bar and light refreshments provided.

www.brattleboromuseum.org


Iva GueorguievaReview in Art in America

October 2011

Iva Gueorguieva (b. 1974) generates a sense of frenetic activity in each of her expansive compositions. The 15 large-scale paintings at Ameringer McEnery Yohe and nine works on paper at Bravin Lee Programs constituted the Bulgarian-born, Los Angeles-based artist’s New York solo debut. Produced in the past two years, the works feature flying trajectories and curving eruptions of line and color that create a sense of depth and movement. Her spaces are as whirlpool-like and active as those of Julie Mehretu, but her cascading forms share the physicality of Matta’s fanciful paintings. With her deft handling of multiple techniques and distinctive use of color, Gueorguieva is consistent but not repetitive.

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Frederick Hammersley: The Origins of Pictorial SpaceThe Brooklyn Rail, by Robert C. Morgan

The Brooklyn Rail, October 2011

Throughout the history of Modernism, the reputations of many painters have become known through their association with groups of like-minded individuals. Some of these associations are casual while others become definitive movements involving exhibitions and critical dialogues, at times using a manifesto or style of presentation as a means to communicate their aesthetic or to reinforce their social, political, and conceptual aspirations. Art movements have a temporal role in the history of art. They exist for a relatively short duration before members spin off in other directions.

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Patrick WilsonGOOD BARBECUE at Vielmetter Gallery

27 September 2011

Modernism's grandest break with art history was not its pursuit of the minimal but its abandonment of technical virtuosity. Wilson remains the most ambitious, dextrous and mind-bogglingly precise painter working in abstraction in many years... maybe ever. If you never imagined a mesmerized audience staring at a descendent of Malevich with the "how does he do it" look in their eyes usually reserved for photorealists, get down and see this nearly sold-out show. click here : www.huffingtonpost.com

Judy PfaffThe Influentials: SVA Women Alumni Invite Artists Who Have Shaped Their Work

26 August - 21 September

School of Visual Arts (SVA) presents "The Influentials," an exhibition featuring distinguished female alumni of the College and the diverse group of artists who have influenced their practice. "The Influentials" is both an investigation into the creative lineage between contemporary artists and a dialogue between mentors and mentees that crosses generations, gender and media. The exhibition is co-curated by independent curator Amy Smith-Stewart adn SVA Director of Development and Alumni Affairs Carrie Lincourt.

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Rod Penner"Photorealism: The Louis K. & Susan P. Meisel Collection"

Mana Art Center, Jersey City, NJ

This exhibition is a major survey of photrealism art from the collection of author and collector Louis K. Miesel who coined the term "photorealism" in 1969.

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Frederick Hammersley: Organic & GeometricThe New York Times, by Roberta Smith

16 September 2011

The hard-edge abstractions of the painter Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009), who began his career in Los Angeles and later moved to New Mexico, have never enjoyed much of a New York presence. They were last seen in bulk here in a two-person exhibition at Artists Space in 1987, a year after the artist’s only New York gallery show and more than 20 years after his rare inclusion in a New York museum show: the Op-Art-centric “Responsive Eye” exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in 1965.

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Patrick Wilson: 12 Must See Painting Shows in the U.SHuffington Post

8 September 2011

The fall art season is in full swing, and there is an overwhelming amount of painting on display at galleries throughout the United States. I expanded my usual Must See list from ten to twelve exhibitions, but I could have easily selected more. As always, I primarily focused on emerging artists, although more established figures such as Susan Rothenberg and Lari Pittman are on the list with impressive new bodies of work.

www.huffingtonpost.com


Suzanne Caporael: (Un)Natural HistoriesKemper Museum

26 August 2011 - 4 March 2012

Featuring works by Suzanne Caporael

www.kemperart.org


Patrick Lee: B-B-B-BAD, an exhibition with attitudesAnna Kustera Gallery

30 June - 12 August 2011

Bad to the bone. That's us. Badness permeates our culture. It's the party crasher no one invited but everybody is secretly glad showed up. Because goodliness has always been boring and being bad can be cool. It comes in many guises: Über-badass bikers, mischievous children, ham actors, hungry wolves, politicians, Blaxploitation heroes, fashion choices, gestures, cigarettes and omens. Things get interesting when they go bad. It's a bad, bad, bad, bad world—and it's ours.

www.annakustera.com


Patrick Lee: Deadly FriendsHuffington Post, by Tracey Harnish

27 July 2011

Photorealism does not especially intrigue me, but in Patrick Lee's work, the technique is just the starting point for further revelations. Lee's graphite portraits of men are meticulous down to the very pores that sprout whiskers. The figures are set in a style reminiscent of the early 1900s, with heads floating in a limbo of whiteness, and I am reminded of the decades old black and white photos of my grandmother's family. Yet these portraits are startling contemporary insights into the society of men. Bald heads, scars, tattoos and ethnically diverse, these men virtually wear the stories of their lives on their necks, faces, and heads. In a culture where youth is trumpeted no matter the class or color of the individual, it's an interesting relief to see men, instead of kids, depicted here. These are men who clearly have lived lives of intensity and peril and are part of a society that signals their wounds with physical visuals.

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Wolf KahnIn Latter-Day Focus, Color & Consequence

The Brooklyn Rail, July 2011

Kahn works a canvas with the relentlessness of the rising tide. Several times during a visit to his studio, I would become enamored by a finished and already framed painting, only to have Kahn point at a certain spot in it that, to his mind, required more yellow there, or a more intense blue here. His painting is always incomplete—another precious contribution of sensibility art to this packaged culture of ours. Can you imagine Damien Hirst or Jeff Koons obsessing about a square inch of one of the large concoctions they have others illustrate from their photoshop compositions?

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Patrick LeeWestern Projects, L.A. Times Art Review

30 June 2011

Patrick Lee’s gorgeous portraits of tough young men are great works of art because they entice you to imagine what it might be like to live in someone else’s skin.

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Esteban Vicente: Grey Art Gallery, Ameringer McEnery Yohe and Parrish Art MuseumArt in America, by Tom Williams

June/July 2011

Three recent exhibitions in the New York area offered an opportunity to assess the career of the late Spanish-born Abstract Expressionist Esteban Vicente (1903-2001).

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Robert MotherwellPainting on Paper: The Drawings of Robert Motherwell

Art Gallery of Ontario, 25 June 2011 – 11 December 2011

Abstract Expressionist artist Robert Motherwell called paper the most “sympathetic of all painting surfaces,” remarking that “it’s a struggle to get a canvas to have the beautiful surface that paper, by nature, already has.”

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Patrick LeeNew Drawings

Western Project, 18 June - 23 July 2011

Western Project is proud to present the second solo exhibition by Los Angeles artist Patrick Lee. After a successful show in New York last year, the artist will present seven recent large scale drawings and a new video project.

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Rebecca Campbell: Broodwork: It's About TimeBen Maltz Gallery

30 April - 11 June 2011

An exhibition that explores what family life can provide to creative professionals. While having both a family and a productive practice is nothing new, the trend of honoring the synthesis of the two is a current phenomenon.

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Oliver Arms: Summer Group ShowWilliam Griffin Gallery

4 June - 13 August 2011


Wolf Kahn: Technicolor FieldsArt + Auction

June 2011

Wolf Kahn’s recent paintings, continuing his long engagement with rural New England as fodder and muse, still manage to startle and delight.

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Iva Gueorguieva: CutBravinLee

21 April 2011 – 27 May 2011

Featuring works by Iva Gueorguieva

www.bravinlee.com


Hans HofmannRiches of a City: Portland Collects

The Portland Art Museum, 5 February 2011 – 22 May 2011

The Portland Art Museum's sprawling new exhibition, "Riches of a City: Portland Collects," announces its intention the moment you walk in the door: It's about the warmth and pleasures of domestic life -- if not always in the art itself, at least in where it comes from. - Bob Hicks

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Iva Gueorguieva: Ten Must See Painting Shows in the U.S.Huffington Post

May 2011


George McNeilArt in America, by Faye Hirsch

May 2011

There were just five George McNeil paintings in Perlow’s tiny space this winter, but even this small number made me wishfor a full-on museum exhibition of this underknown artist.

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Nancy Graves: A Memorial ExhibitionA Memorial Exhibition

The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, 17 May - 28 August 2011

Nancy Graves: A Memorial Exhibition brings together seven works from the Art Center’s permanent collection by the artist Nancy Graves.

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Esteban VicenteConcrete Improvisations: Collages and Sculptures by Esteban Vicente

Southern Methodist University, 15 May – 31 July 2011

Concrete Improvisations: Collages and Sculpture by Esteban Vicente will feature approximately 80 of the artist’s works, both collages and polychrome sculptures, which Vicente referred to as divertimientos or juegos, (“toys” in English). Vicente’s “toys” display his thorough understanding of Cubism, Constructivism and assemblage. Together, this group of works will reveal interesting facets of the career of this accomplished, if unassuming, artist.

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Judy PfaffArtist’s Talk at Ohio State University, Wexner Center for the Arts

9 May 2011, 4:00 pm

Through a distinguished career that stretches back to the 1970s, she has exhibited internationally and received many prestigious awards—including a MacArthur Fellowship and National Endowment for the Arts grants. Pfaff has also been strongly dedicated to education in the arts.

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Iva Gueorguieva: ‘A Stitch in Graft’ and ‘Cut’Review in The Village Voice

4 May 2011

Updating the tenets of that short-lived movement for the current era, Iva Gueorguieva’s recent paintings at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe (“A Stitch in Graft”)—one of two concurrent shows for the Bulgarian-born artist—produce similar spellbinding effects.

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Hans HofmannTina Dickey, "Color Creates Light: Studies with Hans Hofmann,"

Book signing, 3 & 5 May 2011

Artists tell the story of a charismatic teacher and his ideas in Color Creates Light: Studies with Hans Hofmann by Tina Dickey, recently released by Trillistar Books. The author will travel to New York in early May for two book signings: on May 3 at 8pm, a signing at Spoonbill & Sugartown Books in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and on May 5 from 5-7pm, a Cinco de Mayo signing at Ameringer McEnery Yohe in Chelsea.

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Patrick LeeDrawings for the New Century

Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 19 March – 11 Sept 2011

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts has actively collected drawings for nearly a century, acquiring works of outstanding quality by many of the world's most prominent artists.

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Judy PfaffFalk Visiting Artist

Weatherspoon Art Museum, 13 January – 17 April 2011

The Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is pleased to present the exhibition Judy Pfaff: Falk Visiting Artist. The internationally renowned artist is one of the pioneers of installation art, which is work that is site-specific and three-dimensional. Since the 1970s, she has been on the forefront of combining aspects of sculpture, painting, and architecture to form dynamic works that transcend aesthetic boundaries.

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Rebecca CampbellRomancing the Apocalypse

LA Louver, Venice, California, 10 March – 16 April 2011

Our times demand that we embrace paradox. In response, instead of parsing out the incompatible, my experiment is the opposite. I seek the radiant, the abject, deliverance and damage in concert. These paintings are a manifesto for rapture, in spite of, or even in debt to, the abyss.

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Iva GueorguievaGoldmine: Contemporary Works from the Collections of Sirje and Michael Gold

5 February - 10 April 2011

On view through April 10, the exhibit highlights an impressive collection of contemporary works from a wide variety of artists collected by the Golds for more than 30 years. Like many high-profile Los Angeles-based collectors — such as Edythe and Eli Broad or Lynda and Stewart Resnick — the Golds’ collection demonstrates an acute sense of style, taste and artistic understanding.

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Rebecca CampbellRomancing the Apocalypse

Los Angeles Times, 8 April 2011

Rebecca Campbell’s new paintings are looser and juicier and far more beautiful than anything she has made since she began exhibiting her haunting works in Los Angeles 10 years ago. They’re also stranger and scarier than anything else being made today — despite, and because of, their generally benign subjects: pretty girls, gorgeous rainbows and sublime fireworks.

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Suzanne CaporaelThe Memory Store

Art in America, March 2011

New York-based Caporael is an inveterate road tripper (having covered some 30,000 miles in her lifetime), and she used her most recent cross-country excursion as the basis for the 12 paintings on display here (all 2009 or ’10). Despite their highly abstract forms, the canvases, some of them fairly substantial in scale (the largest are 60 inches tall) and many with thickly painted surfaces, manage to convey Caporael’s journeys in a way that feels as fresh and honest as a lap-held diary.

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Michael ReafsnyderFeast

ARTnews, March 2011

In Michael Reafsnyder’s joyously frenzied paintings, each rectangular picture, with its layers of drips, swirls, daubs, and arcs, in every hue imaginable, was also a map of its own creation. Together with his cacophonous multicolored, biomorphic ceramic sculptures, these works seemed primarily designed to energize their audiences.

For his showy topography, Reafsnyder used a variety of application methods: spreading the paint with a flat edge, allowing it to drip from above, applying it directly from the tube, touching it with his hand (or perhaps his arm), or, while the paint was still sticky, lifting it off the surface. The lush, thick surfaces put one in mind of cake frosting as much as they did Abstract Expressionism. Arguably Gerhard Richter’s spirit was being channeled—and challenged—as was Jackson Pollock’s.

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Liat YossiforPerformers From a Future Past

The Los Angeles Times, March 2011

The palette of Liat Yossifor's new paintings is calm, cool and collected. Soothing grays predominate, ranging from whisper-soft tints as delicate as a mourning dove's feathers to steely shades that would be at home on a battleship.

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Rebecca CampbellIt Speaks to Me: on Edouard Manet’s ‘The Ragpicker’ at the Norton Simon

Los Angeles Times, March 2011

Manet was sort of a dandy, so I don’t know what he could have possibly known about the reality of being a ragpicker or homeless person. This is a very outside-in look at a subject. But for me what’s really compelling is that there’s a tiny still-life in the left-hand corner: a painting within the painting. You can make out a shard of glass, a lemon peel, a bit of garbage — but it looks like he’s only touched the canvas a few times.

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Esteban VicenteMidcentury Collectivism

New York Times, March 2011

“Esteban Vicente: Portrait of the Artist,” at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, starts with one artist, but quickly — and thankfully — opens up into one of these broader, more inclusive chapters. Vicente (1903-2001), a Spanish-born artist who lived most of his life in New York, was best known for his collages, and a big red abstract-floral one greets visitors at the entrance. A watercolor by his contemporary Philip Pavia, “Freefall No. 2” from 1959, hangs nearby, however, turning the installation immediately into a dialogue.

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Robert MotherwellADAA 2011

The Art Newspaper, 6 March 2011

“Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell had a lifelong obsession with Irish novelist James Joyce. In 1948, Motherwell painted The Homely Protestant after opening a copy of Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake” and randomly placing his finger on a page to select the title for the painting.

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George McNeilTRANS/FIGURE/ATION

Review in: The Boston Globe, 23 February 2011

George McNeil was not among the most well known abstract expressionist painters, but he was in the thick of it in the 1940s and 1950s, showing his brash, bright, gushing abstractions alongside work by de Kooning and Pollock. In the late 1950s, as the movement sputtered out, McNeil began incorporating the figure into his paintings. “TRANS/FIGURE/ATION’’ at ACME Fine Art traces McNeil’s evolution as a figure painter through the 1960s and into the early 1970s.

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Iva GueorguievaAUGMN

Angles Gallery, 9 April - 15 May 2010

Angles Gallery is pleased to present AUGMN, an exhibition of new paintings and drawings by Bulgarian-born Iva Gueorguieva.

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Iva GueorguievaIn the Studio

Los Angeles Times, 2009

Nouns and adjectives go a long way to describe works of art, but the turbulence within Iva Gueorguieva's paintings demands verbs -- lots of verbs. Shapes billow, pulse and scatter; lines thrust and plummet; colors collide, dissolve, shriek and sigh. The paintings engulf the body. They send the eye skittering.

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Judy PfaffARTnews

April 2009

Judy Pfaff, who once wowed the art world with her formally and spatially inventive installation art, has recently turned her attention to paper. Her newest pieces, shown here, exist in box-like metal frames defining a narrow band of space—maybe five inches deep. Viewers should not let the works’ apparent flowery “decorativeness” dissuade them from inspecting all that is happening within this shallow space. Pfaff still has an uncanny grasp of spatial complexities. The details in these works provide sustenance for eyes starved of unabashed beauty. It’s as if she were compressing a gallery’s worth of glorious installation art into a confined space.

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